PRR5940 L6a

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GG1 Electric Locomotives

PRR4859 GG1

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THE INCREDIBLE GG1

" Based primarily on the design of the earlier, less successful P-5a, the magnificent GG1, with it's 2-C+C-2 wheel arrangement and articulated frame, proved so impressive in its initial tests in 1933, that between the years 1934 and 1943, a total of 139 units were built. For the next half-century, this powerful and aesthetically pleasing marvel could be found at the head-end of the majority of passenger and freight traffic that ran up and down the Northeast Corridor. Although the last revenue run of a GG1 took place in the early 1980's, for many of us who grew up with her sleek beauty and quiet power, the 'G' will always have its own special place in our hearts and memories". - Harv Kahn

See Ilustrated GG1 Roster - Most Complete Roster on the Net

Click on a photo to retrieve it. Click on the name below the photo to contact the OWNER of the photo.


PRR GG1 #4861

Jeff Sumberg

NJT GG1 #4877
. South Amboy NJ 1981
Joseph Testagrose

PRR GG1 #4859

© 1994 Corel Corp

PRR GG1 #4890

Robyn Black

PRR GG1 #4935

Rich Clark

Amtrak GG1 #902

John Van Scoyk

CR Bi-cent GG1 #4800

Harv Kahn

PRR GG1 Shop at Wilmington

Robyn Black

PRR GG-1 #4913
, Altoona PA 2004
Bill Blomgren

PRR GG-1 #4913
, Altoona PA 2004
Bill Blomgren

American Railroad GG1 #4902

Joseph Testagrose
"The 'American Railroad' was applied especially to unit 4902 for the May 19th, 1969 Baltimore-New York run of the Golden Spike Centennial Limited's return trip from Ogden, UT. The pale blue paint remained for awhile without the commemorative lettering, and then it was completely repainted." - Harv Kahn
American Railroad GG1 #4902

John Van Scoyk
 Wilmington DE 1941
Photo by Bob Redden

After the introduction of the GG1 in 1934 and with 58 of them in service by 1935 the PRR had two Classes of main line electric locomotives, the GG1 and the P5a. The GG1s were used for passenger service and the less sucessful P5a locomotives were hauling freight. The PRR wanted a dual passenger-freight electric locomotive and developed a 2-B+B-2 that incorporated the best features of the previous electric locomotives. The Altoona Shops built a single prototype of this husky streamlined 4-4-4-4 Class DD-2 and outshopped it in 1938. The 72' - 6" hybrid was given road number 5800 and was put to test.

The Class DD-2 had 62" drivers powered by 625 HP motors like the Class R-1 and an articulated frame like the GG1 for better tracking and had a welded carbody. It employed quill drive and with its freight gearing (21 to 83 ratio) had a maximium speed of 70 mph and with passenger gearing (28 to 76 ratio) was designed for 100 mph. The DD-2 was tested with freight gearing and was never geared for passenger service. This 450,000 lbs locomotive was rated at 5000 HP and exerted 71,500 lbs of tractive effort.

The DD-2 was a very good electic locomotive, but it just wasn't that much better than the GG1. With the GG-1 fleet at 72 units by 1938, it was decided that more GG1s would be built and thus avoiding having yet another class of electric locomotive on the railroad. After testing, the single example of the Class DD-2 stayed in service and was used often as the Baltimore Tunnel Helper and for many years it hauled local freight trains between Wilmington, DE and Philadelphia, PA. It was scrapped in 1962. Article by Richard Duley

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